Department of Labor and Revenue

Title - South Dakota Appraiser Certification Program

News Articles - December 2010


Anonymous Complaints


Discipinary Action Information


Review of Cases


New Licensees


Upgrades - November 2010


Contents of a Workfile as Required by USPAP


Records as Required by Administrative Rule


Appraiser Qualifications Board Q&A

Anonymous Complaints

ARSD 20:14:11:01.01. Anonymous complaints. Initiation of an investigation may be commenced upon receipt of an anonymous complaint if it meets the following criteria:

(1) The allegations of violations of any provision of this article are considered credible and based upon factual information which is independently verifiable; and

(2) The complaint is accompanied by a copy of the appraisal report or other documents which contain clearly identifiable errors or violations of the provisions of this article.

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Disciplinary Action Information

Information regarding disciplinary action taken against an appraiser is available upon written request to the Department of Revenue and Regulation, Appraiser Certification Program, 445 East Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501 or email: appraisercertification@state.sd.us.

Include in the request for information the name of the appraiser and the appraiser's city and state of residence. (Disciplinary action may include denial, suspension, censure, reprimand, or revocation of a certificate by the department. (Administrative Rule of South Dakota (ARSD) 20:14:11:03)

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Review of Cases

For the period January 1, 2010 through November 15, 2010, the Department has received 19 upgrade applications and initiated 21 complaint investigations.

Upgrades - 10 pending, 1 agreed disposition, and 8 issued.
Complaints - 11 pending, 3 final disposition, and 7 dismissed.

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New Licensees

James E. Canavan, State-Certified General - Portland, ME
Peter M. Margerum, State-Certified Residential - Prospect, KY
Jed R. Klein, State-Registered - Huron, SD
Amanda E. Murphy-Sanders - Louisville, KY

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Upgrades - November 2010

Stuart Almos, State-Certified Residential
Gregg Neu, State-Licensed

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Contents of a Workfile as Required by USPAP

What information must be retained in an appraiser's workfile?

An appraiser must prepare a workfile for each appraisal, appraisal review, or appraisal consulting assignment. The Record Keeping section of the ETHICS RULE states:

The workfile must include:

the name of the client and the identity, by name or type, of any other intended users; true copies of any written reports, documented on any type of media (A true copy is a replica of the report transmitted to the client. A photocopy of an electronic copy of the entire signed report transmitted to the client satisfies the requirement of a true copy.); summaries of any oral reports or testimony, or a transcript of testimony, including the appraiser's signed and dated certification; and all other data, information, and documentation necessary to support the appraiser's opinions and conclusions and to show compliance with USPAP, or references to the locations(s) of such other documentation. The appraiser's assignment workfile serves several purposes. As in many other professions, the discipline of enforcement by public agencies and peer review, together with one's self-discipline and dedication of effort, serves to ensure performance of assignments in compliance with professional standards. In addition to facilitating enforcement, a workfile aids the appraiser in handling questions from the client or an intended user subsequent to the date of the report.

An appraiser's assignment workfile preserves evidence of the appraiser's compliance with USPAP and other information as may be required to support the appraiser's opinions, conclusions, and, in the case of an appraisal consulting assignment, recommendations. [USPAP Frequently Asked Questions - Page F-29, Question Number 59.]

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Records as Required by the Administrative Rules

A real estate appraiser shall retain originals or true copies of all written contracts engaging the appraiser's services for real estate appraisal work and all reports and supporting data assembled and formulated by the appraiser in preparing the reports for five years. The five-year period for retention of the records is applicable to each engagement of the services of the appraiser and begins on the date of the submittal of the appraisal to the client. However, if, within the five-year period, the appraiser is notified that the appraisal or report is involved in an investigation, litigation, or state or federal review, the five-year period for the retention of the records begins on the date of the final disposition of that investigation, litigation, or state or federal review. [ARSD 20:14:07:01]

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Appraiser Qualifications Board Q&A

The Appraiser Qualifications Board (AQB) of The Appraisal Foundation establishes the minimum education, experience and examination requirements for real property appraisers to obtain a state certification. The AQB Q&A is a form of guidance issued by the AQB to respond to questions raised by appraisers, enforcement officials, users of appraisal services and the public to illustrate the applicability of the Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria and Interpretations of the Criteria in specific situations and to offer advice from the AQB for the resolution of appraisal issues and problems. The AQB Q&A may not represent the only possible solution to the issues discussed nor may the advice provided be applied equally to seemingly similar situations. AQB Q&A does not establish new Criteria. AQB Q&A is not part of the Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria. AQB Q&A is approved by the AQB without public exposure and comment.

Vol. 2, No. 2 - December, 2010

Qualifying Education

Question: I was pursuing a General Certification credential and completed a 30-hour qualifying education course on "General Appraiser Market Analysis and Highest and Best Use" approved by my state. I decided to pursue a Residential Certification instead, which requires 15 Hours of "Residential Market Analysis and Highest and Best Use." Can I use the General Appraiser course to count as my qualifying education in this category?

Response: The Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria sets forth module names of the Required Core Curriculum areas which must be covered in a candidate's qualifying education for each appraiser classification sought. Furthermore, Guide Note 1 of the criteria provides guidance on subtopic areas that should be covered under each of the modules of the Required Core Curriculum, in order to prepare the candidate to pass the National Uniform Licensing and Certification examination for the specific credential. However, coverage of all of the subtopics under each module is not required in order for a course to be approved by your state appraiser regulatory agency as qualifying education.

Thus, given the commonality between the subtopics covered in the respective General and Residential Highest and Best Use courses, under the Criteria, a state could approve the General course toward the Required Core Curriculum for the Residential classification. However, be sure to check with the specific state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdiction in which you are seeking a credential to verify their specific requirements and course approvals, which could be more specific.

Continuing Education

Question: I am certified in multiple states. If I attend and successfully complete a continuing education course in one state, can I use it to count toward my recertification in another state?

Response: In the event the course, provider and delivery mechanism (classroom or distance education) are approved in both states, then each state may grant you CE credit for taking the one course. Each state has a unique method of approving courses. Thus, be sure to check with the specific state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdictions in which you are seeking to recertify your credentials to verify their requirements.

Qualifying Experience

Question 1: Is there an assumption that a typical residential appraisal takes "X" hours to develop and report? If someone submits a log to the state and says they have acquired 3,000 hours of experience by doing ten "URAR" form reports, would they be believed? Or, is there a range that makes sense, like between 4 and 12 hours for a "typical" assignment?

Response: The Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria does not specify the amount of experience hours which may be claimed per assignment. The state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdiction where you are seeking a credential is responsible for examining your experience log and must be satisfied there is a reasonable relationship between the amount of time you claim to have spent on an assignment and your description of work performed. Some states have established typical hours for specific types of appraisal assignment types, which they use as a benchmark to identify potentially excessive experience claims. Be sure to check with your supervisory appraiser and your state appraiser regulatory agency to make sure you comply with the hourly requirements when claiming experience.

Question 2: I am employed by a county appraisal district where we value properties for ad valorem tax purposes. My job requirements include valuing real property using the sales comparison approach, performing on-site inspections of properties, using mass appraisal tools to assign real property values, analyzing sales on an annual basis, etc. Our state requires that my appraisal experience for state licensure or certification must comply with the Appraiser Qualifications Board criteria for acceptable experience. Does my position as a Residential Appraiser at the appraisal district meet the AQB criteria for acceptable experience?

Response: Just by serving in a municipal appraisal position, you are not automatically granted credit. Per the Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria the quantitative experience requirements must be satisfied by time spent on the appraisal process: analyzing factors that affect value; defining the problem; gathering and analyzing data; applying the appropriate analysis and methodology; and arriving at an opinion and correctly reporting the opinion in compliance with USPAP. Based upon the minimum criteria set forth by the AQB, a state could, after review of your work log and work samples, grant you experience credit for work completed in ad valorem, mass appraisal assignments. However, check with the specific state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdiction in which you are seeking a credential to verify their requirements, which may be more restrictive.

Question 3: I am presently a Certified Residential appraiser and I am pursuing a change to Certified General. I realize a Trainee who applies to become Certified General is required to accumulate 3,000 hours of experience (with at least 1,500 being non-residential). However, does this mean that a Certified Residential appraiser would only have to accumulate 1,500 hours of commercial experience to satisfy the experience requirement?

Response: The Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria requires 3,000 hours of experience accumulated during no fewer than 30 months, of which 1,500 hours must be non-residential. Under the Criteria, experience gained in pursuit of a credential is not exclusive to that specific credential. Thus, based upon the minimum criteria set forth by the AQB, a state appraiser regulatory agency could, after review, count the experience earned toward your Certified Residential credential along with the additional experience earned toward the 3,000-hour requirement for the Certified General credential. However, be sure to check with the specific state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdiction in which you are seeking a credential to verify their requirements, which may be more restrictive.

Question 4: I have been a Licensed Real Estate agent for several years and also an appraiser Trainee for over one year. I have a supervisor for whom I do appraisals and I also get paid by a bank to do Broker Price Opinions (BPOs) that require very similar information as an appraisal (including providing six comps). I act as a completely unbiased person doing these BPOs and have no interest in the properties. Can these BPOs be counted on my appraisal experience log?

Response: If the BPOs do not comply with USPAP, regardless of the level of detail or the scope of work performed, they are ineligible for experience credit. (Refer to the 2010-11 USPAP document for further information on not misrepresenting your role when acting as an appraiser versus a broker/sales person/mortgage broker.)

If, however, the development and reporting of the BPO complies with USPAP, and your supervisory appraiser provides direct supervision over your preparation thereof, reviews and signs your work product, it is possible a state appraiser regulatory agency might count these as appraisal experience. However, be sure to check with the specific state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdiction in which you are seeking a credential to verify their requirements, which may be more restrictive.

Question 5: I am a licensed forester and an Appraiser Trainee. My supervisory appraiser is a forester and a Certified General Appraiser. As a part of my company's forestry practice, I often perform timber inventory and valuation reports (timber cruises) to estimate the value of timber. Can I utilize my timber cruise experience to satisfy the 3,000 hours of required real property appraisal experience toward earning a Certified General credential?

Solely developing a timber inventory and valuation report does not qualify for real property valuation experience. However, if you develop a timber inventory and valuation report and appropriately utilize this information in an appraisal of real property, it may qualify for real property valuation experience provided the appraisal complies with USPAP. Furthermore, as with other types of appraisal assignments, an individual providing significant real property appraisal assistance in the appraisal may receive credit for these assignments, provided the individual is duly acknowledged in the certification of the report as having provided significant real property appraisal assistance, and the description of their assistance is included in the appraisal report. Be sure to check with the specific state appraiser regulatory agency in the jurisdiction in which you are seeking a credential to verify their requirements, which may be more restrictive.

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Marcia Hultman, Secretary
700 Governors Drive
Pierre, SD 57501-2291
Tel. 605.773.3101
Fax. 605.773.6184